INTRODUCTION TALMUD ADIN STEINSALTZ PDF

The Essential Talmud is a masterful introduction to the beliefs, attitudes, and “ The Essential Talmud” by Adin Steinsaltz (Basic Books), which has recently been . Introduction Au Talmud has 7 ratings and 2 reviews. Sameh said: تقييم النسخة العربية للكتابالكتاب جيد الى حد وان كان يحتاج الى تبسيط بعض المفاهيم وشرح ا. A masterful introduction to the to the great repository of Jewish wisdom, the Talmud In The Essential Talmud, the renowned Israeli scholar and teacher Rabbi .

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. A masterful introduction to the to the great repository of Jewish wisdom, the Talmud In The Essential Talmudthe renowned Israeli scholar and teacher Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz succinctly describes the history, structure, and methodology of the sacred text by which the Jewish people have lived and survived through the ages.

Rabbi Steinsaltz summarizes the Talmud’s main principl A masterful introduction to the to the great repository of Jewish wisdom, the Talmud In The Essential Talmudthe renowned Israeli scholar and teacher Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz succinctly describes the history, structure, and methodology of the sacred text by which the Jewish people have lived and survived through the ages.

Rabbi Steinsaltz summarizes the Talmud’s main principles, demonstrates its contemporary relevance, and captures the spirit of this unique and paradoxical text as a human expression of divine law. This expanded edition features a historical overview of life in the times of the Talmud and an in-depth look at the content and appearance of the original Talmudic page. As Rabbi Solomon S.

Bernards of the B’Nai B’rith Anti-Defamation League puts it, “this book is indispensable to those, Jews and Christians alike, who would like to gain an insight into what it is that moves the contemporary Jew.

PaperbackThirtieth Anniversary Editionpages. Published September 12th by Basic Books first published July 27th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other sgeinsaltz questions about The Essential Talmudplease sign up. Lists with This Book. I was frustrated in reading this, in part because I wasn’t sure who the audience was. The book introductikn a rough overview of the history of the compilation of the Talmud, its contents, and its internal logic, but there are massive gaps in each of these and problems with the book’s overall organization that make it a very flawed introduction from any standpoint.

The history of compilation doesn’t mention, for example, any clear historical context for the first group of sages, and while Steinsaltz s I was frustrated in reading this, in part because I wasn’t sure who the audience was.

The history of compilation doesn’t mention, for example, any clear historical context for the first group of sages, and while Steinsaltz says later in the text that up to a certain point, older scholars take precedence and after that point, more recent scholars are more authoritative, he doesn’t actually tell you who belongs in which category or where the demarcation point is.

The combination makes the introdyction problematic either for academics studying Jewish culture or for novice Talmud scholars trying to interpret Jewish law. Words like Midrash, which are fairly common, are translated, but Aggadah is used throughout and even gets a chapter to itself without a real definition or enough examples to give the reader a rough estimate of its meaning.

There were some bright points: But overall, this didn’t feel like a standalone kntroduction, or even a compiled series of lectures, it felt like a love letter to the text written by someone who can’t remember a time when he didn’t know it inside and out. Sep 18, Michael Doyle rated it it was amazing Shelves: A surprisingly easy read, especially since it’s in translation from the original Hebrew.

This is a friendly yet detailed introduction to the Talmud, including the history through several eras of those who wrote it, how the Talmud is laid out, and examples of the themes and types of argument that the Talmud contains. That might not sound like enough to fill a few hundred pages but it is.

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The Essential Talmud: Adin Steinsaltz: : Books

When you’re done, you’ll understand much better what the Talmud is and how it came to be. You won’t however, h A surprisingly easy read, especially since it’s in translation from the original Hebrew. You won’t however, have a detailed understanding of what the Talmud contains. That would take a much larger book. Read this book to learn what the Talmkd is, not to learn a lot about what’s in it.

Some ideas were completely new to me, though they become obvious once you think about it. The reason I would not give this a full five stars is because the author sometimes speaks 4. Perhaps this is because he wants his controversial statements to be less controversial this book can be enjoyed by Reform and Orthodox Jews alike. Also, the author does not use enough examples to demonstrate his points, nor does he cite anything he says.

Some of the ideas were revolutionary, and I would have really appreciate citations. Perhaps this is so the book can appeal to Orthodox people who would otherwise be scared off if they realized R’ Steinzaltz was using introxuction academic scholars as opposed to his vast knowledge of Rabbinic sources as the basis for some of his points.

Also, the writing style is sometimes weird – almost stream of consciousness- and I wonder whether this is the fault of the author or the translator.

Having said that, it’s an amazing book, easy to read, and I thought it was useful and important. Aug 09, Joel Weinberger rated it really liked it. This book was a solid intro to the structure and thought process of the Talmud. I started reading this because I’ve started doing “Daf Yomi,” reading a page of Talmud a day, and this has been a good jump start in understanding what I’m reading.

A lot of the really good stuff is the contextual information about the Talmud. While the tractates themselves are fairly straightforward as to their content, “The Essential Talmud” gives a great historical and religious context for what the Talmud is, whe This book was a solid intro to the structure and thought process of the Talmud.

While the tractates themselves are fairly straightforward as to their content, “The Essential Talmud” gives a great historical and religious context for what the Talmud is, where it came from, and why it’s important. A intgoduction on the author and his style: Thus, there is inevitably a religious view on the Talmud within the book.

However, the book is about as objective as you could hope, given that it is a religious text. While the author makes assumptions at times, and certainly shows a reverent awe for the Talmud, he also is candid about the historical context and the authors. A few relatively minor complaints. Steinsaltz could have provided more examples. He often describe parts of the Talmud, for stelnsaltz how the Sages would tell stories, without providing examples. Similarly, the book could use some deeper explanations such as on the logical techniques of the Gemara.

Jun 22, Leiah Moser rated it liked it Shelves: A fairly useful introduction to the Talmud, introdiction somewhat flawed in organization. The chapters dealing with the history of the text are somewhat confusing, with a tendency to bounce back and forth chronologically when dealing with parallel developments in the Palestinian and Babylonian academies. Once the book begins to talk about the organization and content of the Talmud, it gets better.

The Essential Talmud: An Introduction

A few of the steinsalhz dealing with laws relating to the Steinsaltzz, liturgy and festival days tzlmud seem rather A fairly useful introduction to the Talmud, but somewhat flawed in organization. A few of the chapters dealing with laws intrdouction to the Sabbath, liturgy and festival days will seem rather basic to anyone who’s xteinsaltz through an “Introduction to Judaism” class, but that may have to do with Steinsaltz’s intended audience.

At any rate, this book should provide an excellent grounding in the history, structure and purpose of the Talmud. Dec 02, Dave rated it really liked it. This review has been hidden because it introoduction spoilers.

To view it, click here. This book will not teach you the Talmud, it will prepare you to understand and to learn from the Talmud. This book is a detailed description of the history of the Talmud, how it came to be, it’s role, and it’s various parts. It is a lengthy but valuable introduction to the Talmud for anyone wishing to begin studying it or to take a new look with open eyes and a thirst for the wisdom within.

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Sep 18, Daniel Frank rated it liked it. A great book about our history and steinsxltz we are. Aug 08, Jan Peczkis rated it really liked it. Inadvertent Implications This book, authored by Talmudic scholar Adin Steinsaltz, provides a useful general overview of Jewish beliefs and customs, notably those of the Talmud. Unfortunately, however, author Adin Steinsaltz repeats the misconception that the Christian view of marriage is that of a necessary evil.

This is far from the truth. In fact, in Roman Catholicism, marriage is a sacred act before God The Sacrament of Matrimonywhich goes far beyond a contract between two parties. I now focus on a number of notable themes: The ban is no stricter than that against the consumption of horse or camel flesh, yet the Talmud says: It is possible that the peculiarly intense reaction was the result of the Seleucid attempt to force the Jews to eat and sacrifice pigs, and it may be the consequence of the fact that one of the accepted symbols of the Roman legions especially those that fought in Palestine was the pig.

The foregoing has implications beyond the Laws of Kashrus. He would have us believe that it stwinsaltz innocuous because, after all, in MAUS, all the characters introducfion animals. For example, Germans are cats and Jews are mice. Such a line of argumentation, while ostensibly plausible, is not.

The flesh of cats, mice, and pigs are all unclean, but that of the pig is magnitudes more so. In addition, the emotional antipathy towards pigs, a longstanding Jewish cultural meme, can survive even among unobservant Jews. However, Talmudic scholar Adin Steinsaltz points out that evidence for the existence of a formal Oral Law, for at least the first several centuries after Moses, is tenuous.

He comments, quote We know very little of the origins and early development of introductiom oral law, since information on cultural and spiritual life in the First Temple era is generally sparse. But from various hints in the Bible, we can ascertain how the oral law evolved to interpret and complement written legislation. What about Jews who reject steinsaktz law?

Introduction Au Talmud

Steinsaltz notes that the Sadducees, and—much later—the Karaites, ended up creating their own oral tradition. The author also shows how the value of ongoing Talmudic scholarship in the revitalizing of Jewish communities. Steinsaltz writes, “Some communities did not produce scholars from their midst because of material poverty, lack of suitable candidates as the result of the decrees of authoritiesor indifference. Whatever the reason, however, the fact is they did not survive for long.

In the course of Jewish history, various ethnic communities have tried to maintain their Judaism, sometimes even on a strictly traditional basis, without Talmudic avin. The same process occurred in all of them, the components of their Judaism were weakened and began to introducttion, the deeper significance of issues was no longer fully understood, and inappropriate interpretations were evolved, so that despite sincere efforts to maintain traditions, such communities lost their vitality and died out.

Sometimes the process was protracted, with tradition gradually becoming more and more a matter of outward show for lack of sages capable of endowing it with new life, and assimilation inevitably followed. The foregoing, of course, has implications for other religions. The same revitalizing principles can very much apply to Christian communities—to keep them from drifting into dead orthodoxy, dead formalism, indifferentism, and decline.